Last year around this time I was casually jamming my weekend away and as a normal 21st century citizen shared behind the scene pictures with my friend Laura. She encouraged me to take some photos, because the packaging was the cutest and flavor mixings not the ordinary ones. Of course, the photos were lost somewhere in the sea of my hard drive. But luckily enough they resurfaced just in time.

Nothing has changed and I still am making jams like a crazy person, but that being said, I don't use any particular recipe. While I stay true to classics, I love experimenting. So today I will share some of the main rules I follow to make a successful batch of jam, that is still a classic, but has a twist! 

1. Use seasonal produce.
Although this goes without saying, I have noticed that people buy produce for jams when they are not particularly in season - either too early, or too late. You will get the best tasting produce for the best price during the peak-season. Peak-season calendar. 

2. Use what you have got on hand.
Use spices and produce you have lying around starting with cloves, liquoricey star anise, vanilla and ending with citrus, bananas, ginger and even chilli peppers or lavander. This is how you get memorable flavors. But don't over exaggerate when adding, remember that flavors will bloom within time. 

3. Make small batches. 
This way you won't get overrun with the amount of work and jars of jams afterwards. This way you can also use produce that you have got in your kitchen, but don't really want to eat right away or go bad with time. 


4. Experiment, but be aware of amounts.
I have actually never had a batch that turned out inedible, which is a surprise knowing the things I mix. For example, I put together banana with gooseberries, added chilli to apples, mixed plums with Cointreau and flavored pears with vanilla. Also I add lemon zest to everything and don't shy away from lavender. While not the craziest mixes, they are quite risky and with a potential to taste like soap when amounts of spices added are too large. 

5. Have fun with packaging. 
I use abundance of jars in different shapes and forms to store my jams. It comes in handy when making small batches and when storing. It looks insanely cute and makes up a perfect last moment present. Also, I sterilize my jars in dishwasher and don't go beyond anything else. 


MY FAVORITES

PLUMS - ORANGES
PLUMS - LAVENDER
BANANA - RED CURRANTS
APPLES - CHILLI
RED ONION - BASIL
PEAR - GINGER
PEACHES - LAVENDER
STRAWBERRIES - BASIL
BLACK CURRANTS - RASPBERRIES


Last year around this time I was casually jamming my weekend away and as a normal 21st century citizen shared behind the scene pictures with my friend Laura. She encouraged me to take some photos, because the packaging was the cutest and flavor mixings not the ordinary ones. Of course, the photos were lost somewhere in the sea of my hard drive. But luckily enough they resurfaced just in time.

Nothing has changed and I still am making jams like a crazy person, but that being said, I don't use any particular recipe. While I stay true to classics, I love experimenting. So today I will share some of the main rules I follow to make a successful batch of jam, that is still a classic, but has a twist! 

1. Use seasonal produce.
Although this goes without saying, I have noticed that people buy produce for jams when they are not particularly in season - either too early, or too late. You will get the best tasting produce for the best price during the peak-season. Peak-season calendar. 

2. Use what you have got on hand.
Use spices and produce you have lying around starting with cloves, liquoricey star anise, vanilla and ending with citrus, bananas, ginger and even chilli peppers or lavander. This is how you get memorable flavors. But don't over exaggerate when adding, remember that flavors will bloom within time. 

3. Make small batches. 
This way you won't get overrun with the amount of work and jars of jams afterwards. This way you can also use produce that you have got in your kitchen, but don't really want to eat right away or go bad with time. 


4. Experiment, but be aware of amounts.
I have actually never had a batch that turned out inedible, which is a surprise knowing the things I mix. For example, I put together banana with gooseberries, added chilli to apples, mixed plums with Cointreau and flavored pears with vanilla. Also I add lemon zest to everything and don't shy away from lavender. While not the craziest mixes, they are quite risky and with a potential to taste like soap when amounts of spices added are too large. 

5. Have fun with packaging. 
I use abundance of jars in different shapes and forms to store my jams. It comes in handy when making small batches and when storing. It looks insanely cute and makes up a perfect last moment present. Also, I sterilize my jars in dishwasher and don't go beyond anything else. 


MY FAVORITES

PLUMS - ORANGES
PLUMS - LAVENDER
BANANA - RED CURRANTS
APPLES - CHILLI
RED ONION - BASIL
PEAR - GINGER
PEACHES - LAVENDER
STRAWBERRIES - BASIL
BLACK CURRANTS - RASPBERRIES

2 comments

  1. Ļoti patīk Tavs jaunais izkārtojums, manuprāt, lieliski atbilst Tev un Tavam blogam! :)
    Runājot par ievārījumiem, mans visvismīļākais ievārījums ir aveņu, bet nekad neesmu mēģinājusi ar to eksperimentēt pievienojot dažādas garšas. Būs jāpaskatās vai avenes tirgū vēl ir pieejamas (dārzā jau beigušās :/) un jāsamiksē kaut kas jauns priekš rudens/ziemas.
    Paldies par iedvesmu!

    www.callmemaddie.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Paldies! :)

      Jā, avenes ir tāda lieta, ko diezgan grūti ar kaut ko citu apildināt, jo viņas jau tā ir ļoti izteiktas. Ieteiktu vienkārši pamēģināt pielikt to, kas pašai garšo, arī, ja tas ir kaut kas negaidīts.

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